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Issue 2 - 22 January 2016

Articles – Nursing Older people (RCN)

1. Needs of older people exceed ability of services to respond, claims report
By Nick Triggle
Nursing Older People, Volume 27, Issue 10, 26 November 2015
Abstract
: Arguably, the greatest challenge faced by the UK’s health and care sectors in the 21st century is trying to meet the needs of the country’s ageing population. However, if a report by Age UK is accurate, services in England are failing to meet them.

2. What to do when under scrutiny
By Lucy Williams
Nursing Older People, Volume 27, Issue 10, 26 November 2015
Abstract
: In August, the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) concluded an 81-day hearing into care failings at Brithdir Care Home in Caerphilly, Wales. The hearing ended the UK’s biggest inquiry into allegations of neglect to date. It led to three nurses being struck off, a fourth being suspended for one year and a fifth being given a caution order.

3. Practice Question: When should I use one-to-one nursing for a patient with dementia or delirium? How can I make it positive and therapeutic for the person?
Nursing Older People, Volume 27, Issue 10, 26 November 2015
Abstract
: A hospital admission can be bewildering for people with dementia or delirium. Staff can have difficulty managing what they perceive to be unsafe behaviour and so adopt one-to-one nursing to minimise risk. However, one-to-one nursing is often applied haphazardly or is not managed robustly enough to ensure efficacy and cost effectiveness. Some organisations have policies to guide staff about when and how to apply observation, but these are often in place to minimise organisational risk rather than to consider the needs of the person experiencing distress.

4. How a rapid response team is supporting people to remain at home
By Esther Clift
Nursing Older People, Volume 27, Issue 10, 26 November 2015
Abstract
: This article explores the work of a rapid response team (RRT) in an English city. The RRT is a multiprofessional intermediate care team that is able to support patients to remain at home during clinical crises and changes to their social care needs. The National Audit of Intermediate Care is in its fourth year and benchmarks how intermediate care services are delivered across England. RRT data are compared with the national data, and show that keeping the team as a crisis intervention service has enabled it to maintain capacity to support patients at home without requiring hospital admission.

5. Developing a nurse-led ‘red legs’ service
By Rebecca Elwell
Nursing Older People, Volume 27, Issue 10, 26 November 2015
Abstract
: As the population ages, more complex care is required to manage multiple comorbidities. In response, a nurse-led service was developed to care for patients with ‘red legs’. This chronic inflammatory condition is often misdiagnosed as acute cellulitis and can result in unnecessary hospital admission and inappropriate treatment, with substantial resource and financial implications for trusts.

6. Enabling hospital staff to care for people with dementia
By Jennifer Bray , Simon Evans , Mary Bruce , Christine Carter , Dawn Brooker , Sarah Milosevic , Rachel Thompson & Catherine Woods
Nursing Older People, Volume 27, Issue 10, 26 November 2015
Abstract
: This is the fourth and final article in a short series that presents case study examples of the positive work achieved by trusts who participated in the Royal College of Nursing’s development programme to improve dementia care in acute hospitals. Dementia training in hospitals is often inadequate and staff do not always have sufficient knowledge of dementia to provide appropriate care. It can also be difficult for them to identify when patients with dementia are in pain, especially when their communication skills deteriorate.

7. Reducing social isolation in a rural community through participation in creative arts projects
By Ruth Pearce & Sue Lillyman

Nursing Older People, Volume 27, Issue 10, 26 November 2015
Abstract: This article reports the initial findings from the evaluation of four creative arts projects involving groups of older people living in a rural community. The purpose of the projects was to reduce social isolation among participants through providing direct access to arts and social activities.

Articles – Patient Dignity

8. Student nurses’ experiences of preserved dignity in perioperative practice – Part I.
By Blomberg, Ann-Catrin; Willassen, Elin; von Post, Iréne; Lindwall, Lillemor.
Nursing Ethics. Sep 2015, Vol. 22 Issue 6, p676-687. 12p
Abstract
: In recent years, operating theatre nurse students’ education focussed on ethical value issues and how the patient’s dignity is respected in the perioperative practice. Health professionals are frequently confronted with ethical issues that can impact on patient’s care during surgery. The objective of this study was to present what operating theatre nurse students experienced and interpreted as preserved dignity in perioperative practice

9. Student nurses' experiences of undignified caring in perioperative practice - part 11
By Willassen, Elin; Blomberg, Ann-Catrin; von Post, Iréne & Lindwall, Lillemor.
Nursing Ethics. Sep 2015, Vol. 22 Issue 6, p688-699. 12p
Abstract
: In recent years, operating theatre nurse students’ education focused on ethics, basic values and protecting and promoting the patients' dignity in perioperative practice. Health professionals are frequently confronted with ethical issues that can impact on patient’s care during surgery. Objective: The objective of this study was to present what operating theatre nursing students perceived and interpreted as undignified caring in perioperative practice

10. The significance of small things for dignity in psychiatric care.
By Skorpen, Frode; Rehnsfeldt, Arne; Thorsen, Arlene Arstad.
Nursing Ethics. Nov 2015, Vol. 22 Issue 7, p754-764. 11p
Abstract
: This study is based on the ontological assumption about human interdependence, and also on earlier research, which has shown that patients in psychiatric hospitals and their relatives experience suffering and indignity. Aim: The aim of this study is to explore the experience of patients and relatives regarding respect for dignity following admission to a psychiatric unit

11. Dignity and patient-centred care for people with palliative care needs in the acute hospital setting: A systematic review
By Pringle, Jan; Johnston, Bridget & Buchanan, Deans.
Palliative Medicine. Sep 2015, Vol. 29 Issue 8, p675-694. 20p
Abstract
: A core concept behind patient-centred approaches is the need to treat people with, and preserve, dignity in care settings. People receiving palliative care are one group who may have particularly sensitive needs in terms of their condition, symptoms and life expectancy. Dignity is more likely to be violated in hospital settings. Given the high percentage of people with palliative care needs who are admitted to hospital during their last year of life, the provision of dignity enhancing and preserving care in that setting is of vital importance

12. Relational interactions preserving dignity experience
By Tranvåg, Oscar; Petersen, Karin Anna & Nåden, Dagfinn.
Nursing Ethics. Aug 2015, Vol. 22 Issue 5, p577-593. 17p

Abstract: Dignity experience in the daily lives of people living with dementia is influenced by their relational interactions with others. However, literature reviews show that knowledge concerning crucial interactional qualities, preserving their sense of dignity, is limited. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore and describe crucial qualities of relational interactions preserving dignity experience among people with dementia, while interacting with family, social network, and healthcare professionals

Journal - Table of Contents

From Singapore Nursing Journal, Volume 42, No. 2, May-August 2015

13A. Editorial: Nursing shortage – Do we have answers?
13B. Evaluation of a project – Clinical Leadership Programme that prepared senior nurses and nurse managers at the national Kidney Foundation, Singapore for renal dialysis nurse-led model of care
13C. Evidence-based nursing: A Singaporean perspective
13D. Advanced practice nurse (APN) internship: Swim or Sink – A reflection on experience
13E. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy: Considerations for nursing practice
13F. Research in Brief: Health-related quality of life, psychological well-being, an sexual function in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia after prostatic surgery in Singapore
13G. Research in Brief: Mental representation of nurses in their adoption of an innovative wound clinical decision support system in Singapore
13H. Systematic review summary – Telerehabilitation services for stroke

Conference

14. Safeguard National Health & Safety Conference 2016
Date
: 25-26 May 2016
Venue: SKYCITY Convention Centre, Federal Street, Auckland (New Zealand Room, Level 5)
More information:
http://safeguard.co.nz/databases/modus/events/safeguard-national-health-safety-conference

News – National

15. Wellington Hospital maternity ward cuts bad for mothers, say midwives
Stuff - January 21 2016
http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/76040580/wellington-hospital-maternity-ward-cuts-bad-for-mothers-say-midwives

16. Being frozen 'to death' saved Justin Smith's life, and it could save others too
When a US doctor declared a frozen man was too cold to be clinically dead, an extraordinary operation to save him began. Here is an excerpt from Lehigh Valley Health's film about Justin Smith.
Stuff -  January 21 2016
http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/americas/76126951/being-frozen-to-death-saved-justin-smiths-life-and-it-could-save-others-too

17. District health board staff owed millions of hours in annual leave
Stuff - January 19 2016
Health workers across New Zealand are owed more than eight million hours in annual leave, with fears overworked staff could make dangerous errors if they cannot take time off. Information obtained by Labour showed staff at 18 district health boards (DHBs) were owed 8.6 million hours in annual leave as of June 2015 - an average of more than two weeks of leave per staff member.
http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/76020187/district-health-board-staff-owed-millions-of-hours-in-annual-leave

News – International

18. New cancer treatment radiation centre to open at University of Canberra
The Age - January 21, 2016
A new state of the art cancer centre in Canberra's north will be able to treat an extra 800 patients a year when it opens at the University of Canberra.Icon Cancer Care will invest $15 million to install two linear accelerators in the private facility after it was given the OK by the federal government and a $4 million grant to replace the radiation machines at the end of their 10-year lifespan.
http://www.theage.com.au/act-news/new-cancer-treatment-radiation-centre-to-open-at-university-of-canberra-20160121-gmatqu.html

19. Cases of mesothelioma continue to rise: StatsCan
Canadian Press – 22 January, 2016
TORONTO — The numbers of cases and deaths from mesothelioma, a deadly cancer caused primarily by workplace asbestos exposure, have continued to rise and show no signs of abating, recently updated figures from Statistics Canada show. Described as a “cruel” disease, mesothelioma is an aggressive cancer that develops in the lining of the lungs as a result of inhaling asbestos dust and fibres.
http://news.nationalpost.com/health/cases-of-mesothelioma-continue-to-rise-statscan

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