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Issue 19 Library e-newsletter 17 June 2019

Books
 

1. Tradition & Reality: Nursing and politics in Australia
Brigid McCoppin & Heather Gardner
Published 1994
This book analyses and explains the gains Australian nurses have made, the pressures for and against change, and possible future directions. While the main focus is the period 1960-1990, the structure, status, and image of the profession are seen as deriving from its historical roots.

2. The dark side of nursing
Ingrid Teresa Pryde
Published 2014
In The Dark Side of Nursing, author Ingrid Teresa Pryde shares her story of bullying in the health-care field. When she decided to make nursing her lifework, she had no idea the profession that she associated with compassionate care harboured a dirty little secret: a culture of bullying. Her story serves as a backdrop for the discussion of a serious issue and is supported by substantive academic research, stories taken from current news reports, and personal accounts.

3. Mary Seacole: The charismatic black nurse who became a heroine of the crimea
Jane Robinson
Published 2005
The 'Greatest Black Briton in History' triumphed over the Crimea and Victorian England. "The Times" called her a heroine, Florence Nightingale called her a brothel-keeping quack, and Queen Victoria's nephew called her, simply, 'Mammy' - Mary Seacole was one of the most eccentric and charismatic women of her era. Born at her mother's hotel in Jamaica in 1805, she became an independent 'doctress' combining the herbal remedies of her African ancestry with sound surgical techniques.

Articles – Vaping
 

4. ARFNZ offers expert advice on 'Vaping Facts' website
NZ Doctor – 12 June 2019

Abstract: The Asthma and Respiratory Foundation NZ commends the Ministry of Health on the creation of their ‘Vaping Facts’ website, but maintains that this is still the beginning of a long process. ARFNZ Chief Executive Letitia O’Dwyer says that the Foundation fully supports the development of new methods of smoking cessation for those struggling to quit, but that vaping alone won’t help most people to give up smoking.

5. Behavioural support is key when using e-cigarettes for smoking cessation - new research shows
NZ Doctor – 1 February 2019

Abstract: Yesterday 31 January 2019, The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) published the following positive study ‘A Randomized Trial of E-Cigarettes versus Nicotine-Replacement Therapy’.
Letitia O’Dywer, Chief Executive Asthma and Respiratory Foundation NZ, reports: “As we know, smoking rates are higher for Māori and Pasifika peoples. This new study shows that e-cigarettes could be a useful tool in the battle against higher smoking rates, alongside wraparound smoking cessation services.

6. Differences in use of electronic nicotine delivery systems by smoking status and demographic characteristics among Australian young adults
Jongenelis, Michelle I; Brennan, Emily; Slevin, Terry; Kameron, Caitlin; Rudaizky, Daniel
&  Pettigrew, Simone
Health Promotion Journal of Australia: Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals, Vol. 30, No. 2, Apr 2019: 207-211

Abstract: Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) continue to grow in popularity, particularly among young adults. Understanding by whom various ENDS are being used and why within this population segment can assist the development of appropriate interventions targeting those most vulnerable to use and inform policy decisions in this area. Accordingly, this study assessed the demographic characteristics associated with ENDS use among Australian young adults, and reasons for current e-cigarette use.

7. AIHA White Paper Warns of Potential Hazards of Vaping
Professional Safety; Des Plaines Vol. 64, Iss. 5,  (May 2019): 15.
Abstract
: AIHA has issued a white paper that reviews current scientific data and evaluates the effects of chemicals used in e-cigarettes as well as those emitted by them during use. The paper presents evidence that the devices can release airborne contaminants that may affect not only users and those around them as well.
Access the white paper at https://bit.ly/2DroRY6

8. A Randomized Trial of E-Cigarettes versus Nicotine-Replacement Therapy
Hajek, Peter; Phillips-Waller, Anna; Przulj Dunja; Pesola Francesca; Myers, Smith Katie; et al.

The New England Journal of Medicine; Boston Vol. 380, Iss. 7,  (Feb 14, 2019): 629-637.
Abstract:E-cigarettes are commonly used in attempts to stop smoking, but evidence is limited regarding their effectiveness as compared with that of nicotine products approved as smoking-cessation treatments.

9. New vaping products with techy allure exploding in popularity among youth
Glauser, Wendy.
Canadian Medical Association. Journal: CMAJ; Ottawa Vol. 191, Iss. 6,  (Feb 11, 2019): E172-E173.
Abstract
: A high-dose nicotine vaping device is taking off in Canada, and public health experts are concerned it will lead to a rise in nicotine addiction among youth. Juul has become the best-selling vaping product in the US since its launch in 2015.

10. E-cigarettes Are Being Marketed as "Vitamin Delivery" Devices
Basáñez, Tatiana, PhD; Majmundar, Anuja, MBA, MA; Cruz, Tess Boley, PhD; Allem, Jon-Patrick, PhD; Unger, Jennifer B, PhD.
American Journal of Public Health; Washington Vol. 109, Iss. 2,  (Feb 2019): 194-196
Abstract
: During our ongoing research on tobacco-related marketing, we have observed several e-cigarette companies making unsubstantiated claims that their products provide health benefits including an improved immune system, better sleep, and increased energy. The 2009 Tobacco Control Act requires the FDA to consider the health impact of regulatory actions on nonusers of tobacco and gives it the authority to regulate false and misleading statements used to advertise these products.

Articles – Clinical Nurse Specialists
 

11. Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Managing Patients with Chronic Conditions.
Hansen, Mary P. Nursing Economic$, Mar/Apr2019; 37(2): 103-109. 7p
Abstract
: The complex care of patients with chronic conditions threatens the stability of healthcare economics. Clinical nurse specialists, in roles that leverage full scope of practice, positively impact the Triple Aim and are vital to meeting this rising need.

12. Clinical Nurse Specialist: The Unknown APRN.
Ward, Cynthia; MEDSURG Nursing, Nov/Dec 2018; 27(6): 347-348. 2p
Abstract
: The author offers information on clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). They are described by the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists as expert clinicians with advanced training in a specialized area of nursing practice. The Office of Management and Budget classify CNSs as general registered nurses in the 2018 revision to the Standard Occupation Classification System. They are said to be the only advanced practice registered nurses who practice in the three spheres of influence.

13. The testicular cancer nurse specialist: a pivotal role in patient care.
Dreyer, Barend; Macfarlane, Kathryn & Hendry, David
British Journal of Nursing, 10/4/2018; 27(18): S26-S27. 1p
Abstract
: The article discusses the authors' views about the important patient care-related role that a testicular cancer nurse specialist plays, and it mentions how testicular cancer is the most common type of cancer among young men in Great Britain as of 2018. Testicular cancer diagnoses and treatments are addressed, along with a nurse specialist's work in the surgical work-up stage of cancer management.

14. Clinical Nurse Specialists Play an Essential Role in Delivering High-Quality Care.
AACN Bold Voices, Sep 2018; 10(9): 6-7. 2p
Abstract
: CNSs are master’s-prepared experts in evidence-based nursing who practice in a range of specialty and subspecialty areas.

15. Every Medical-Surgical Nurse Deserves a Clinical Nurse Specialist.
Saunders, Mitzi M.
Med-Surg Matters, Sep/Oct 2018; 27(5): 1-11. 4p
Abstract
: Clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) are advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) who are clinical experts and leaders across healthcare systems. Medical-surgical nursing care is optimized when CNSs support the work of the nurse at the bedside and in the boardroom.

16. Community palliative care clinical nurse specialists as independent prescribers: part 1...first of a two-part article
Latham, Kathy & Nyatanga, Brian
British Journal of Community Nursing, Feb 2018; 23(2): 94-98. 5p
Abstract
: The Department of Health and Social Care has recently reiterated its commitment to improvement in the quality of end-of-life care and emphasised the importance of all patients having rapid access to medication. The aim of this study was to explore the lived experiences of clinical nurse specialists who are able to prescribe independently in their role in providing support for patients with palliative care needs within the community setting.

17. Community palliative care clinical nurse specialists as independent prescribers: part 2.
Latham, Kathy & Nyatanga, Brian
British Journal of Community Nursing, Mar 2018; 23(3): 126-133. 7p
Abstract:
This study explored the lived experiences of clinical nurse specialists who can prescribe independently in their role of providing support to patients with palliative care needs within the community. Part 1 of this study examined how the study was carried out; this second part explores the findings. The nurses reported that being able to prescribe enabled them to provide seamless, holistic care, which gave patients faster access to medicines, especially at weekends when their GP was unavailable.

Journal – Table Of Contents

The Tube, Vol. 44, Issue 11, May 2019


18A. Chairperson’s report
18B. Gastro forum review February 2019 [Jess Wolfenden]
18C. Leaders & managers study day – registration form
18D. The IBD Nursing manual: From concept to reality
18E. Inflammatory bowel disease nursing manual; 1st ed. 2019 [Description of the contents and details of where to purchase]
18F. New Zealand Society of gastroenterology – Annual scientific meeting Dunedin 2018
18G. Antimicrobial wipes
18H. Gastroenterology units in New Zealand – contact details

Conferences
 

19. 2nd World Congress - Organ Transplantation and Artificial Organs
Theme
: Exploring New Dimensions in Organ Transplantation
Date: November 12-13, 2019
Venue: Brisbane, Australia
More information: https://organtransplantation.conferenceseries.com/

20. 2020 Tripartite Colorectal Meeting
In partnership with The NZ College of Stomal Therapy Nursing and The Australian Association of Stomal Therapy Nurses Inc.
Theme
: “Looking Forward, Looking After - Ma Muri Ki Mua”
Date: 9–12 November 2020
Venue: Auckland, New Zealand
More information: http://www.tripartite2020.com/

News – National
 

21. Supporting farmers’ mental health – new research
Healthcentral - June 13, 2019
New research shows that farmers dealing with stress and mental health concerns, need practical help and advice, which agricultural professions are well placed to deliver.
https://healthcentral.nz/supporting-farmers-mental-health-new-research/

22. Auckland health authorities giving measles vaccine to younger kids
Radio New Zealand – 12 June 2019
Health authorities will start giving babies their first measles vaccine at a younger age in Auckland, in an effort to curb the region's outbreak of the disease.
https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/391833/auckland-health-authorities-giving-measles-vaccine-to-younger-kids

23. DHB fears measles spreading in Northland
Radio New Zealand- 11 June 2019
Health authorities suspect measles may now be widespread in Northland and they're hearing only about the most serious cases. Nine cases have been confirmed in the region, three of them since last week and one of those people is in intensive care with complications
https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/391699/dhb-fears-measles-spreading-in-northland
 

News – International
 

24. What are the perks and problems of being a night owl?
Medical News Today – 14 June 2019
In the collective imagination, night owls are free, creative spirits. Yet studies have shown that people who are more active at night face greater health risks. Do night owls experience more benefits or risks due to their rhythms?
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325479.php

25. What personalised medicine could mean for your health
By Dr Emma Davenport Wellcome Sanger Institute – 14 June 2019
Medicine has always been personal to some extent - a doctor looks for the best way to help the patient sitting in front of them. But with advances in technology, it is becoming possible to use the most unique of characteristics - our genomes - to tailor treatments for individuals
https://www.bbc.com/news/health-48254137

26. The crisis in care: Who pays?
By Alison Holt
Over 10 months, a small team from the BBC’s Panorama programme documented the realities of how the care system is working in England. Based in Somerset, they followed the stories of people needing care and of the people trying to provide it. The pressures faced here are being felt across the country as the demand for help from an ageing population increases and local authorities struggle with tight finances
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/extra/MYx8zCtDRI/the_crisis_in_care

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